Tuesday, 20 August 2013

More journal themes

Last meeting, we also brought along our journals to share. The theme for July was Doors.

Tricia began by writing the word Doors all over the page, to stimulate her thinking. She started to think about significant doors she has seen. Her first door was a photograph of one from a church, which she manipulated in a graphics program.
On the facing page, she wrote words of blessing that relating to the door. I love the gorgeous texture and colour in the image. It would make an amazing textile work!
She had other doors but she hadn't yet written the words - they'll come along later.

Maz also listed words that relate to doors, with associated thumbnails, and sketched a pair of double doors.

Then she listed and sketched thumbnails of  parts of doors. Her final sketch was another door on a stone building.
The sketch was from her imagination, which is so clever. She's got a great eye for detail.

Helen found images of different kinds of doors...
 and drew a door that opened to show..

...more images of doors and a door image manipulated in PhotoShop, which shows when the first door is opened.

She began a list of words for doors and drew another door
I love the fish jumping through the porthole!
Nola began by drawing a front door with pen on salt-dyed paper. The door opens to show layers of pages underneath..
 The next page is inside the first door and some words about the door.
On the facing page is a tiled doorway opening, showing another door underneath (part of what was visible when the first door was opened)...
 On the back of that page are words about that door.

The next image shows a refugee camp, with a tiny, red, opening door on the right. The opening shows only bricks...
..but the other side has a different message...


Jan's door wasn't actually in her book; she was inspired to make a small textile art work.

Her first door, with an embellished strip and a handle made from a twist-tie, opens to show..

...a pair of doors of a woven cloth, like the opening of a shrine, opening to…

...an ethnic embroidery given to Jan by a friend. Isn't it clever?
Our theme for this month is Idiotic Flowers, chosen by Helen. It comes from a time when schools streamed people according to their academic ability. Being in the Art Stream meant you were too dumb to do Business Studies and the Business Studies people were considered too dumb to do Academic stuff like Latin. Helen was condemned to Business Studies while her friend got to do the interesting things in the Art Stream, like creating Idiotic Flowers. I'm grateful that I got to choose electives that interested me, so I could study Art and Latin and Commerce, if I wanted to. And now we all get to create Idiotic Flowers.
Jan also brought along some dyeing samples she had done earlier and brought back from the US on her recent trip. They are all silk organza, white unless indicated otherwise, dyed in different ways with the same kinds of dye.
This first one was first wood blocked, clamped and degummed. This removes the gum in some places but not others, affecting the resulting pattern. Then it was unclamped and dyed with mx Procion, 75% yellow 25% chino. Then it was reclamped and vat dyed, 50% red, 50% blue.
The second one was initially pole wrapped and degummed. Then it was unwrapped and dyed with mx Procion, 75% turquoise 24% fuchsia. Finally it was rewrapped on the pole and vat dyed 75% yellow 25% blue.
The third sample was wood blocked, clamped and degummed. Then it was unclamped and dyed with mx Procion, 75% yellow 25% chino. Finally it was pleated and tied to rope with two sizes of string, vat dyed 75% yellow 25% blue.
The fourth sample was also wood blocked, clamped and degummed; unclamped, dyed with mx Procion, 75% yellow 25% chino; pleated, tied to rope with two sizes of string and vat dyed 50% red, 50% blue.


Sample 5 was again wood blocked, clamped and degummed. Then it was unclamped and dyed with mx Procion, 75% turquoise 25% chino. Finally it was reclamped and vat dyed 75% yellow, 24.5% red, 0.5% red/brown.

Sample 6  was also wood blocked, clamped and degummed first. Then it was unclamped and dyed with mx Procion, 75% yellow 25% mixing red, and finally it was reclamped and vat dyed 90% yellow, 10% red brown.

Sample 7 was initially clamped and degummed and then unclamped and dyed with mx Procion, 75% turquoise 25% better black, Finally it was painted with vat dyes, green (80% yellow, 20% blue) and orange (25% red,75% yellow).

Sample 8 was on black silk organza. It was wood blocked, clamped and degummed twice, with very little discharge. Then it was reclamped and vat dyed, 90% yellow 10% red/brown and then unclamped, scrunched on a rope and dyed with mx Procion, 75% turquoise and 25% better black.

On sample 9, after being wood blocked, clamped and degummed,  she unclamped it and dyed it with mx Procion, 60% mixing red, 25% yellow, 15% chino. Finally she painted it with vat dyes, green (80% yellow 20% blue) and orange (25% red,75% yellow) and steamed it.
 Sample 10: After being blocked, clamped and degummed, it was unclamped and dyed with mx Procion, 50% turquoise, 50% mixing blue. Then it was painted with vat dyes, green (80% yellow 20% blue) and orange (25% red,75% yellow) and steamed to fix.

Sample 11; After being blocked, clamped and degummed, it was unclamped and dyed with mx Procion, 75% mixing red, 25% yellow. Then it was reblocked, clamped and vat dyed 50% red, 50% blue.
It's a wonderful collection of samples, because it illustrates how different procedures and dyes work together to give varied effects. The multiple processes result in complex pieces with a lot of depth.

See you next week, when we are swapping postcards again and working on our Nine Squares project.

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